The need of teaching and learning more languages

For a second, stop to think about how many languages you know. With languages, I do not mean verbal languages: rather, any means of expressing thoughts and feelings, or of expressing a dialogue. I am here do advocate for the learning and teaching of more than just one.

Our western culture is based on the verbal language – the one you can speak with your friends, read in novels, and write in essays. We educate kids in that, and yet I would argue that very few of them end up being proficient in the verbal language. Speaking a language does not make you proficient in it: that skill is a much higher level one, and involves deep knowledge of the structure of the language, exposure to thousands examples of both good and bad usage of the language, and effortful practice throughout years. Often, people who venture in learning a new language (a verbal one) do not even ever get comfortable with their mother-tongue. What I mean is that although everybody can talk in their own language, few of them have a real mastery of it. Few people, for example, are able to tell a story (and not because of lack of ideas, but for inability of structuring it), and even fewer are able to read one out loud in a way that is vaguely engaging (for example, they cannot look away from the book to the audience, and fill in any gaps in their reading my making up appropriate fill-ups).

But even if people were proficient in the verbal language, this is just one means of expression. It is barely minimum. And even though we study several different subjects at school, they are all taken across through the same verbal language. But what about other, different languages?

Musicians, on the other hand, can rarely express the feelings and the moods of a musical piece through words. They have a different alphabet, one that does not have translation to the verbal one. The fact that sometimes, some situation reminds them of a tune, or inspires them a tune, rather than words, is a clear example that the musical language is different altogether. It is incredible that we are still studying Latin and we are not all studying music.

Sports is another example where a different language is in place. The main difference between experienced and beginners in table tennis, for example, is in how they frame/live the unfolding of a point. Experienced players see a dialog in it, a conversation that ultimately leads to scoring a point. But it is exactly this sense of structure, this ability to realize how each stroke is connected and what each of them can have as consequence, that gives experienced players an unmatchable advantage. They know what is going to happen, and they know it because they are building something with that language.

Continue reading

The reasons why mathematics teaching is failing

As a mathematics PhD student, I have seen a lot of mathematics teaching. I have been lucky enough to witness some (very) good teaching, but I have also been inflicted with so much bad teaching. Sometimes, I just wondered whether the people do even realize that their teaching is horrible, and I most often believe they are just unconscious about it, since most of the teaching they were exposed to was bad for them as well. I guess they just believe there is no way of making a good teaching of math, since most of it seems to be so bad.

I genuinely believe all graduate students in any subject should care about teaching. Even if you do not particularly care about teaching others, it makes your knowledge and understanding stronger. Just thinking at what matters (which is what you would teach), and how it would be best presented, forces you to thoroughly understand the topics to a deeper level. And at some point, you will just wonder: what are the essential elements of bad teaching? How can I avoid them?

#1 – Too many answers, too few questions

I am genuinely convinced that the most essential element of bad teaching is providing answers instead/without questions. Too often we go to class and we get lectured about some method, some theorem, some theory – and too seldom we get lectured about the path that actually led to that method, theorem or theory.

Continue reading

On knowing when to stop in software development

One of the very few things I learnt in art class is what the role of Jackson Pollock was in his art. Because, we were asked, what is the role of the artist, if the only thing he does is let paint drop on a canvas? His role is to decide when the work is complete.

This is something we most often overlook in computer science: there comes a time when a project, or a feature, is complete, and any more improvements, any more work put into it is likely to decrease its value and ruin all the good work. Too often we want progress in our applications, without realizing that it’s actually destroying them. Sometimes it’s just better to move on and work on something else. Even if a solution is 10 years old, it doesn’t mean it has to be updated because progress requires it.

Let me present a couple examples.

The Gutenberg editor in WordPress

WordPress 5 introduced the new Gutenberg editor, a project that has been rated with 2 stars out of 5 with a total of around 2000 reviews at the time of writing. It’s a product that is so buggy and un-usable that it is bewildering that it made it into Core, but whatever (in 10 minutes of usage, I found 7 crucial and unreported bugs just 4 months prior to release – see my review).

gutenberg reviewsLet us pause and ponder why it was introduced. Any apology of Gutenberg will say that is because the classic editor felt old. It looked so much like Office 2003, and it’s 2018, they say! You see, they say, 15 years in computer science is a huge deal!

But, you see, what is the main purpose of an editor? To write. And to that it must be apt. Gutenberg shifted the focus from writing content to designing a page, effectively forcing a progress in the wrong direction. Not much has changed in writing since Office 2003 came around: we still use bold, italic, headings, text alignment and little more. Anything else requires the careful crafting of a designer and writing of some HTML, as it should be. Nothing else is needed, really, when it comes to writing. But, they say, you cannot even create a table with the classic editor! And I say, that’s right, it should be possible! But that doesn’t require trashing a whole editor and building a cumbersome React-y thing just so that we can have tables, does it?

But, they say, this way you don’t need a designer to design your pages anymore. Of course, people must be really stupid if they have been paying web-developers/designers to put up their websites for the last 25 years, of course! So stupid of us! There, instead of hiring a professional photographer to shoot at your weeding, just give a compact camera to your uncle, since technology and progress have enabled you to do so. Because it really is just the same. When I was a kid, websites designed with Dreamweaver were looked down on, and anybody who wanted a real site should have hired a professional. Not it looks like everybody can do everything – expect that, uhm, they can’t.

Too often the right questions are not asked and carefully considered. Those are the most basic ones: do we really need this thing? How difficult is it to build it? Is it really worth it? What is the impact it will have on users/market? Does it add something really useful and needed without breaking anything else?

Continue reading

Have I told you we should abolish Facebook?

Yesterday it was my birthday.

My family phoned me or just met me. Then there has been a handful of people who texted me on my mobile, mostly in the morning. I do not care how they remembered my birthday’s date, what I care about is that they took the time and the money (for those who paid) to text me. I am not ashamed to admit I use myself both Facebook and my mobile phone agenda to keep track of birthdays, apart from certain ones that are quite stuck in my head. But what I liked is that those people, the ones who texted me, tried to think of something nice to write and they actually came up with something sweet, something you would fancy reading after waking up. Those were the people closer to me. Some of them even told me that it was Facebook that remembered them it was my birthday, but they actually sent me an SMS and did not use Facebook to write me.

Continue reading

How Windows 8 is the clear proof that Microsoft can’t lead

I’ve just had a quick look at the Windows 8 developer preview. Not screenshots, rumors or reviews around, I’ve actually installed it on VirtualBox and tried it myself. Yeah, it’s still early beta, developer preview, whatever you want… but what a crappy thing!! It’s not really up to bugs, instability and this kind of stuff, it’s all about the concept, that’s doesn’t make any sense at all! With this, I think Microsoft showed the last -though more evident- evidence they can’t lead – they must follow others’ footsteps. Apple has already said that eventually iOS and Mac OS will converge somehow but it’s not speeding this change up, it’s¬†obviously¬†something that will take time and, of course, PCs will never disappear. Anyway, slowly, it’s fine to develop new stuff for the mobile ecosystem and leaving the desktop a little behind because that’s where the average user will move, and the mass market with it. What’s not ok -actually, it’s foolish– is to think that the same operating system can provide a great user experience on both small and large screens. On portable and desktop devices. On 7/10″ and 25″ monitors. How could you possibly think that?!

Continue reading