Getting started with Binary reverse engineering: an example

For a challenge in a university security class, I was given this file to crack: reverse1. I started with reverse0, which was considerably easier than the second one. In this post I will briefly explain how I tackled reverse1. I provided the files so you can you try on your own and then came back for hints if you are stuck! If you are new to this business, as I relatively am, I advise you to start from reverse0 and crack that first.

Hashes of reverse1 file: 
MD5 – c22c985acb7ca0f373b7279138213158
SHA256 – cd56541a75657630a2a0c23724e55f70e7f4f77300faf18e8228cd2cffe8248e

Disassembling and hoping for the best

The first thing I did was to disassemble the file with Radare to have a look at the code.

The assembly is quite jumbled up, and difficult to analyse all together. A quick look tells us that trying to crack the file just by reversing the assembly is no easy task, and actually a silly idea to begin with. There’s a cycle after the password is read from standard input, then some other instructions, then another cycle… it’s difficult to get what is going on…

Instead, let’s seek the Bad password print section, and see what should happen for the code to jump there. If we are lucky enough, we may find a bunch of final checks that will send over to the Bad password section. If we can find those, we may then look at those bits of assembly to understand how to avoid going there.

Scroll down enough, and down at the bottom I can see the Bad password part, starting at 0x080484f0.

Radare helps in showing two different arrows going into this address. The related comparisons are the following:

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