Tutorial: Use PayPal Adaptive Payments API (with Embedded Lightbox)

There are two things I am currently working on:

  1. School
  2. Integrating my Post Pay Counter WordPress plugin with PayPal, so that site administrators can pay their writers directly from their blog pages, without having to head to the PayPal website

Apparently, it turns out that you do not get to choose how much time you want to dedicate to the first point. That, matched with the fact that PayPal APIs are horrible and that the documentation is often useless, is making the whole process much longer than I thought. Meanwhile, I am sharing what I have come up with until now (which works pretty well, actually), scheduling a second part of the tutorial for when the job will be completed.

PayPal Adaptive Payments: what it is for

Adaptive payments handles payments between a sender of a payment and one or more receivers of the payment. You are an application owner, such as a merchant that owns a website, the owner of a widget on a social networking site, the provider of a payment application on mobile phones, and so on. Your application is the caller of Adaptive Payments API operations.

Standing to what I have been able to discover about PayPal’s different payment mechanisms over summer, Adaptive Payments represents the most flexible way to transfer funds from one account to another. Also, it seems the only method you can effectively integrate PayPal in your application. Adaptive Payments is in fact for those applications in which your account, as application developer, is not the one you are drawing funds from. Shortly, you need to move money on behalf of someone, and your application is the intermediary.

In my specific case, I needed a way to let administrators put their credentials into my plugin and have PayPal let me get money from their accounts and transfer it to their writers’ ones. Adaptive Payments method was really suitable because it allows six transactions per each request, so that it is possible to send different amounts to several people with only one API request. As bottom line (which I did not need and did not care to dive into), it also allows Chained Payments, in which the primary receiver passes part of the payment to other receivers, splitting the original amount.

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